Larkin & Lacey and Immigrants’ Rights

More than just an immigration status, migrants represent a hard working group of people trying to make the lives of their families better. And this is not a simple process for them. As they work, they are often wondering if they will be underpaid, if they can safely call 911 in an emergency, or what will happen to their American-born children if they are deported. Read more: Michael Larcey | Crunchbase and Michael Larcey | Twitter

The news and politicians are constantly discussing these individuals like they are criminals that are breaking the law by crossing the border while others consider them more than just the status that they represent, but as humans that deserve basic human rights.

These groups are working hard to make sure that these people that are vital to our economy are offered clarified human rights from which they can live. Most of their rights are scattered through treaties and international law and can seem inconsistent and confusing to immigrants.

Thanks to the International Migrants Bill of Rights and legal commentaries that are associated with it, there is a guide that serves as a resource on how international law applies to migrants that help to inform advocates, migrants, countries, and international organizations in an effort to ensure that nations stick with their existing human rights law.

Besides the International Migrants Bill of Rights, there are also various groups that help immigrants here in the United States to navigate the legal system and be aware of their rights. Groups like the (ACLU) Immigrant Rights Project help to bring about strategic impact litigation throughout the United States delivering leadership as well as legal analysis on civil rights, constitutional, and civil liberties issues to the immigration bar, immigration advocates, and community-based groups. It also helps to engage public education and advocacy and to support work of its affiliates.

Other groups like Border Angels is an all-volunteer non-profit that fights for reform on immigration law and social justice focusing just on the U.S.-Mexico border. It also provides awareness and educational programming as well as migrant outreach programs to the immigrant population in the San Diego County. Another advocacy group called the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) focuses on organizing group focusing on realizing civil, human, and labor rights for immigrants

Nationally, there are groups like the National Immigration Law Center that focuses on advocacy, litigation and policy analysis as they fight for the rights of low-income immigrants.

Another leading advocacy group called the National Immigration Forum provides various programs that help to obtain citizenship and to integrate immigrants into the workforce.

Individual groups like the co-founders of Phoenix New Times and Village Voice Media, Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin, are also working on advocating for immigrants’ rights from their own personal experiences. They are using the money they received from a settlement to fund migrant rights organizations all across Arizona that they received from their arrest by Sheriff Joe Arpaio that resulted in a $3.75 million settlement.

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio arrested the two journalists in the middle of the night and jailed when they revealed that grand jury proceedings existed that pursued their notes on articles that covered the Sheriff.

The grand jury subpoenas also revealed an order for the names of those citizens that had read New Times stories online covering the lawman. Both Lacey and Larkin sued the county and prevailed in the United States Court of Appeals for the ninth court to assert and defend their First Amendment rights.

Through the Lacey and Larkin Frontera Fund, support groups will be funded that fight for human, civil, and migrant rights as well as civic participation and freedom of speech all over Arizona.

Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: http://www.laceyandlarkinfronterafund.org/about-lacey-larkin-frontera-fund/